Fri. Jul 23rd, 2021

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How To Prevent Further Bone Loss In Teeth?

5 min read
How to prevent further bone loss in teeth? The answer is simple, make sure that your diet is rich in calcium and vitamin D. However, replacing the missing tooth is the best possible solution to prevent further bone loss in teeth. We lose bones in the jaw when a tooth is removed from its place. Generally, the bone in the jaw slowly deteriorates if the tooth it's attached to is missing. <a href="https://www.prime-dental.com.au/" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">This dentist is an experienced prosthodontist in Sydney</a>, and he highly recommends regular dental visits to ensure optimum dental health.
losing jaw bone

How to prevent further bone loss in teeth? The answer is simple, make sure that your diet is rich in calcium and vitamin D. However, replacing the missing tooth is the best possible solution to prevent further bone loss in teeth. We lose bones in the jaw when a tooth is removed from its place. Generally, the bone in the jaw slowly deteriorates if the tooth it’s attached to is missing. This dentist is an experienced prosthodontist in Sydney, and he highly recommends regular dental visits to ensure optimum dental health.

 

 

Cause of Bone Loss

man holding toothAs mentioned, bone loss in teeth is the result of tooth loss and periodontitis. When the periodontitis gets in severe cases, the bacteria slowly eats away at the jawbone and all the ligaments that link the tooth to the bone.

Eventually, the tooth will have nothing to hold on to and get out of its place, leaving the bone without a stimulator. The jawbone’s strength is maintained through the stimulus of biting and chewing. Since the tooth is gone, there will be no activity that will keep it preserved. After which, the bone will be reabsorbed by the body. About 12 months after losing a tooth, 25% of the bone is already gone. And this will continue until nothing of it is left.

 

Other causes of bone loss around teeth to consider:

While periodontal disease is usually the common cause of underlying jawbone loss, other problems might arise, resulting in the deterioration of the jaw bone. Teeth misalignment is also one of the factors that could result in bone loss. This happens because the misalignment does not allow normal chewing and thus, leaving the bone inactive. It could also happen due to damages to the bone. Sometimes, facial tumors require the removal of some parts of the jaw to prevent them from recurring.

Moreover, poor oral health is also one reason why bone loss in the jaw takes place. Excessive smoking puts the mouth at risk of periodontal disease and makes the teeth and gums weak. Studies also show that smoking does cause not only damage to the teeth but also the bone. Plus, it also affects the success rate of dental treatments. Lack of nutrition is also another reason for bone loss.

 

Symptoms

You will know that you have teeth bone loss if you notice that your teeth are starting to shrink, be loosen, and move from side to side. Once you notice this symptom, you may need to immediately give your dentist a call to prevent total tooth loss.

Other signs:
  1. gaps between the teeth
  2. mobile teeth
  3. bad breath
  4. bleeding gums
  5. gum recession

 

 

Saving the Teeth

The thing is, you can prevent bone loss by making sure that you do not have any loose teeth. Seeking dental treatment for gum disease will ensure that periodontitis will not develop into a much severe case. Once you notice signs of bone loss around your teeth, it would be wiser to give your dental hygienist a call.

Periodontal therapy is the best way to keep your teeth in place; proper oral hygiene will also go a long way. Be sure to brush your teeth every day, floss, and rinse your mouth with fluoride mouthwash.

 

 

Bone Loss Prevention

Further bone loss can only be prevented by replacing the missing teeth. Otherwise, it will only keep on deteriorating as years go by. The best way to do so is by placing a root that can imitate the functions of the jawbone and topping it off with false teeth or a dental crown. This treatment is called dental implants. The implants are planted into the jawbone to serve as the tooth root and anchor the crown.

Dental implants are much more advisable as they can imitate the actual bone and provide strong chewing power to the wearer. Dentures are also okay in a sense, but when it comes to preventing bone loss, they cannot fully prevent it from declining.

 

Ways to Keep Your Bones Strong:

regular dental checkupThere are a lot of things that affect the health of our bones, teeth, and gums. And fortunately, we can make changes to prevent bone loss and keep ourselves healthy such as:

  • Eating a healthy diet. Be sure always to add fruits and vegetables to your meals. Whole grains, meat, and low-fat dairy products are also essential.
  • Always opt for food options that are rich in calcium. An individual needs at least 1000 to 1200 mg of calcium every single day.
  • Take Vitamin D supplements regularly.
  • Be physically active and exercise regularly.
  • Avoid smoking, if possible, stop the unhealthy habit.
  • Avoid excessive alcohol intake.
  • If you notice a loose tooth, take some time and give your dentist a call.

Visiting your dentist regularly will ensure that your teeth are not vulnerable to any oral diseases. Additionally, taking care of your teeth and gums should be one of your top priorities. Brushing and flossing in routine will not only prevent tooth loss but also keep your natural smile healthy.

 

 

Osteoporosis and Bone Health

Osteoporosis is a bone disease that results in weak and thin bones. In some cases, it even results in damaged bones, especially in older adults aging 50 and above—people with osteoporosis at more risk of bone loss around teeth. If you notice, a huge rate of osteoporosis patients has fewer teeth than women with healthy bone density, specifically in women. This can be managed by adding more calcium and vitamins to your diet will keep your bone and oral health strong.

Low Bone Density

Low bone density is less common than bone loss. However, it is still a serious dental condition that needs professional attention. It results from many contributing factors, including unhealthy diet, lifestyle, hormonal imbalance, and diseases.

Dental clinics can detect low bone density with the help of a 3D CT scanner. If the images show that the bones are whiter than usual, it means the bones are denser. Low bone density can be controlled by placing an implant into the bone. The implant will then draw the bone to it to promote denser bone and resolve low density.

 

 

 

 

 

 

References:

Bone Loss and its Treatment (https://pasadenaperiodontics.com/bone-loss-treatment/)

Keeping Your Bones and Teeth Strong for Life (https://www.health.ny.gov/publications/2046/index.htm)

Rebuilding Bone Loss in Gums (https://www.advanceddentistry.co.uk/blog/rebuilding-bone-loss-in-gums/)

 

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